22
Jun

Renovate by Recycling

Trends in renovation and interior design are constantly changing. We could spend all our free time keeping up with these trends and trying to get our home just the way we want it. It's a great way tospend a fortune and, of course, waste a lot. Fortunately, there are ways to renovate on the cheap.

Think before destroying

When we start renovations, we often start off by destroying everything so work can begin quickly. However, by taking time to think about what you want to replace, you may be able to reuse certain materials for other purposes in your home. For example, if you're pulling up floors, you could sand and stain (or paint) the planks to create a unique wall or even a headboard for your bed (see what our Polyformers did for their own projects)!

What about painting more than one room?

To give a home a little facelift, many choose to paint a single room. Depending on the size of this room, you'll need to buy a certain number of paint cans. It's almost impossible to buy just the right amount so that it's all used up. But paint has an expiry date, so why not use your leftover paint for a smaller project? What about painting a single wall in another room or an old piece of furniture?

Kitchen cabinets

Kitchen cabinets get old and yellowed over time, but with a little love they can return to their former glory. For many renovations, it's often easier and cheaper to modify rather than replace. Adding moulding to old 1980s melamine cabinets can give you a modern kitchen with retro style! All you need is time and imagination. You can also alter the shape and size of your cabinets to better match your requirements. The possibilities are endless...

Did you know?

Polyform also uses recycled materials to produce certain products. We opened our POLYVERT RECYCLING plant in 2012 to help us recycle more plastic. The inserts found in NUDURA® insulated concrete forms are made of recycled plastic. Some of our insulating panels, such as HOMEGA® insulation boards, also include recycled polystyrene. This shows we can give a second life to almost anything!

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